19 May, 2011

The View From On High

Thought I'd better get a quick glimpse around before the 21st... Wouldn't want to have the world end without a last view of the old homestead.

Anyway, I had the weather station rehabbing on my list for a while now. It had developed an ominous wiggle in a breeze, so I figured it was time to do some serious stuff before it took a tumble. Besides, I wanted to make it a little easier to take down in the event of a hurricane.

First, I ran up the long extension ladder after attaching the aluminum quick-disconnect stabilizer to it. Although I didn't take a picture of it, these things are life-savers, especially as we get a tad older. They really make an extension ladder feel much more secure. They're easy to put on and remove, and they don't cost very much. I highly recommend you get one.

Anyway, as I was climbing up, I glanced over at the nesting doves (pigeons). Mom and dad were sure keeping an eye on me. They were in no hurry to leave the nest either.  I know Julian had recommended I remove the nest, but when I had gone out to do just that, those trusting little eyes just begged me to let them stay. So I did. It'll be cool when the young ones hatch.
Proud Parents Eying Me
Here's the day's project. I think I've mentioned it before - I'm good for about one project a day down here. This was one of those that should have been spread over three or four days. The heat on the roof was intense. Our heat index gets up around 121° (f) during the day. I was on the roof by 7:00 AM, and was up there for about three hours. Heat stroke candidate No. 1, right here.

As I told Craig when he emailed me today about the heat index, wanting to know if it was accurate (it's pretty close), I told him "The heat index is just like wind chill only different."

In the picture below, I've dismantled the station. You can see the brackets that held it up still agains the short blue wall near the drill. Not real effective. So, the object was to significantly strengthen the whole thing.
Weather Station Dismantled
And, with a snap of the fingers, just like that, it's done. I've just finished applying a coat of Snow Roof to the fittings. This thing is now pretty rigid.
Weather Station Rehab Completed
If you look close at this next photo, you'll see a sleeve in the pole with some bolts keeping it rigid. This is the disconnect for the upper part of the weather station. The lower part with the guy wires and stuff just stays put. I'll undo two bolts and lower the station down to the ground in the event of a hurricane.
Weather Station Detail
After I got that all done, (yes, there were the requisite number of trips up and down the ladder for stuff I forgot or didn't think about till I was almost done), I thought it was time to take a few shots around the place, as I mentioned above.

This first one is a straight-on shot of our house. Still looks pretty good. Hard to believe that tree in the front of it started as a twig a couple years ago.
Our House Still Looks Good
Next, I shot this view of the current, current project, the patio and BBQ area. Kind of gives you a neat perspective of the whole thing.
Birds-Eye View of the Patio Project
And then, just a quick shot of the turn to the left of the canal as it exits to the bay.
Looking At The Canal Left Turn
Here's a nice view of the awning. Still holding  up well. Although it has let the water temperature in the pool creep up to 88° (f) from 86° (f). Still much better than without it. The temp would probably be around the 96° (f) mark.
The Awning From Topside
So, there you have the days labors in a few shots. After I came down and put the tools away, I was tuckered for a while. I drank copious quantities of water, then ate a sandwich, took a nice cool shower and about 1:30 PM jumped into the pool till about 4:30 PM. Ahhhhh, relaxing.

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